As it was going to be a baking hot day, I set off early from Wiltshire so I would arrive just as the gardens opened.

Facade of the house

Leave the M25 at J9 and follow the A243 and then the A24 towards Epsom, Dorking and Leatherhead. Turn on to the A246 and then follow the brown tourist signs – the turning to the house is on the left just as you enter the village of Great Bookham.

The Entrance to the house

I love Polesden Lacey – the Edwardian house is warm and welcoming while the gardens surrounding the house are so varied and full of surprises. Start by walking away from the house along the grass terrace with beautiful views on your right, over the countryside.

At the end of the terrace is the ruins of a colonnade and walking through the woods, you come out on the other side to a meadow which on my visit was covered in butterflies.

Remains of a stone Collonade
Meadow

Walk back past the house and enter the more formal part of the garden

The Garden side of the house
Beautiful blue, pink and white flours in herbaceous border
Herbaceous Border
Ladies Garden with statues against a yew hedge
Ladies Garden
Loggia on the house
Loggia
Lavender Garden
Lavender Garden
Crossroads with yew hedges and central sundial in Walled Garden
Walled Garden
BLue flowers with roses in background
Walled Garden
The ROckery
The Rockery
Flowers growiong with central gravel path in the Walled Garden
Walled Garden
Gardeners Cottage
Gardener’s Cottage
VIew of the bridge in the distance
Beyond the Winter Garden
Bridge across the road
Bridge across the road
The Bridge

History

The first house known to have been built at Polesden Lacey was in 1631 for the Rous family. The estate was bought by R B Sheridan in 1797 but by 1813 the house was in ruins. It was rebuilt as a Grecian villa in 1820s by Joseph Bonsor who also added the walled gardens. In 1853, the house was enlarged for Sir Walter Farquhar and rebuilt again in 1903 by Ambrose Poynter for Sir Clinton Dawkins. The Grevilles bought the estate at the beginning of the twentieth century, enlarged the house and laid out the walled gardens as a series of flower gardens: the Rose Garden, Iris Garden, Lavender Garden and Winter Garden. Mrs Greville left the house to the National Trust in 1942 in memory of her father, the brewer William McEwan.

The Rose garden with yellow, red and pinkish roses all in different geometric beds
The Rose Garden
THe iris garden with all different geometric beds
Iris Garden

As this is a National Trust property, there is a shop and cafe on site

Flint wall in the walled garden
The Walled Garden
Erygium and red flowers and allium seed pods
Within the Walled Garden
Statue of a stone boy
Gates into the walled garden
Entrance into the Walled Garden

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